One thought on “NEON WINTER HAELER X HARSH X DOPE BOYS 30 X RUSKO X CASPA X COCKNEY THUG TRAP SPRAYS REMIX

  1. I never understood D30’S obsession with pumping “dope boys” a lot of people sell drugs not everyone writes it on walls. Seems like desperate need of attention.

    the kicker is that WYSE’S SISTER TESTIFIED AGAINST CHAD STUART GONDOLFI FOR SELLING METH AND HE WAS SENTENCED TO 100 YEARS IN JAIL?
    DOPE BOYS? D30? alot of rumors of wyse co-operating years back in boston against a few writers. he was later found innocent of all of the associated charges and only convicted on the new ones. maybe there is a snitching gene in DNA?

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    Godofii gets century in jail for dealing meth
    Wed, May 7, 2003
    Man caught making alcohol in jail cell after conviction, official says

    By Lana F. Flowers

    The Morning News/NWAonline.net • lflowers@nwaonline.net

    BENTONVILLE — Convicted drug dealer Chad Stuart Gondolfi was sentenced Tuesday to 100 years in prison for selling methamphetamine to an undercover police officer.

    Circuit Judge David Clinger found that a Benton County jury was reasonable in recommending the sentence after a February trial.

    The jury acquitted Gondolfi, 36, of one felony count of delivery of a controlled substance, methamphetamine. It convicted him on a second count of delivery of a controlled substance, a Class Y felony punishable by 10 to 40 years or life in prison.

    Gondolfi has seven prior convictions and is a repeat offender subject to a longer sentence under Arkansas’ habitual-offender law.

    The jury recommended Gondolfi serve 100 years and pay a $10,000 fine. Clinger followed its recommendation, crediting Gondolfi for the time he spent in jail while awaiting trial.

    The judge suspended the fine if Gondolfi remains on good behavior when and if he is paroled.

    Defense attorney Larry Froelich asked Clinger to “moderate the sentence” recommended by the jury.

    Froelich noted that Gondolfi sold methamphetamine worth $200, which is not a large quantity. He said the money the taxpayers will spend to keep Gondolfi behind bars for a century is disproportionate to the crime.

    Deputy Prosecutor Shane Baker asked Clinger to follow the recommendation, because jurors likely considered Gondolfi’s seven prior convictions in Illinois. Those include unlawful possession of a controlled substance, unlawful restraint, deceptive practices, theft and obstruction of justice. Gondolfi spent time in prison for each of those offenses.

    In addition, after he was convicted of the meth-delivery count in February, Gondolfi was caught trying to make alcohol while in the Benton County Jail, Baker said.

    Gondolfi stood briefly, and his voice wavered as he asked the judge for some measure of mercy. Gondolfi said that giving him a long sentence will not prevent others from dealing methamphetamine.

    Clinger chastised Gondolfi.

    “I recognize who you are today, full of dread and remorse. We’ve got a young man that has absolutely zero respect for authority, even today,” Clinger said. “Facing a sentence of 100 years, he is making booze in jail. Is that a person who deserves a break?”

    Immediately after the sentencing hearing, Clinger conducted a separate one on Froelich’s motion that Gondolfi get a new trial, and Clinger denied the motion after hearing testimony.

    Froelich called as a witness Lacy Grace Biesiot, who testified at Gondolfi’s February trial about drug deals. Biesiot broke down in sobs Tuesday and said she could not remember much about places, events or drug deals.

    “I do know that money was transferred. I remember seeing money. I remember seeing dope. But I do not remember exactly how it went,” Biesiot testified.

    Froelich argued that other witnesses contended Biesiot had tried to frame Gondolfi, but Clinger did not let those other witnesses testify at the trial. Froelich also acknowledged that he did not present names of those witnesses to the prosecution prior to trial, as required.

    Gondolfi still faces felony charges in two additional cases. Clinger set a May 22 status hearing and a June 2 trial.

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